The Precarious Position of the Charter School Sector

MASSACHUSETTS EDUCATION Commissioner Jeffrey Riley announced earlier this year that he had brokered an agreement with the mayor of New Bedford, home to one of the state’s worst performing school districts, and a charter school there to allow the school to open a new campus in the city as long as it enrolls students like a traditional neighborhood public school.

The deal garnered a lot of interest for potentially paving the way for other states and school districts looking to grow their charter sector in a politically fraught environment. But earlier this month, Massachusetts state legislators used rare procedural maneuvers to block the legislation needed to give the project a green light, preventing it from ever being introduced in committee and thus ever allowing lawmakers to vote on it.

In the Bay State, where voters said, “No, thank you,” just two years ago to expanding charter schools, critics of the New Bedford deal argue that they don’t want a two-tiered public school system, and anything that smacks of emboldening charter advocates – like a back-door deal to open a charter school – sets a dangerous precedent, even if it’s blessed by the mayor and state education commissioner.

Full story at US News