White Students Get More K-12 Funding Than Students of Color: Report

SCHOOL DISTRICTS WHERE the majority of students enrolled are students of color receive $23 billion less in education funding than predominantly white school districts, despite serving the same number of students – a dramatic discrepancy that underscores the depth of K-12 funding inequities in the U.S.

The top-line finding included in a new report from EdBuild, a nonprofit that focuses on education funding, calls into question the ways state and local dollars are used to prop up some children at the expense of others and exposes a similarly startling funding discrepancy even when comparing poor white and poor nonwhite school districts.

“What we wanted to determine was, in a country where we are so fractured by race, geographically, how does that play out and how much money on the whole do kids who are nonwhite receive versus kids who are white,” Rebecca Sibilia, CEO of EdBuild, says.

Full story at US News

Cash-Strapped School Districts Left Behind by Wealthier Neighbors

POOR SCHOOL SYSTEMS across the country are being left to wither as wealthier districts shut the door on their cash-strapped neighbors, and states are doing little to stop it, a new report finds.

Because schools are funded in large part by local property taxes, they are vulnerable to the same economic swings as the communities in which they are located. When things go south, many states do little to ensure the struggling districts that can no longer afford to operate schools are absorbed by their more well-heeled neighboring districts.

“What happens when the local economy bottoms out like we’ve seen in a lot of Rust Belt states in part? What happens to the kids that are left there?” says Rebecca Sibilia, CEO of EdBuild, an education nonprofit that focuses on school funding. “School districts are forced to go hat in hand to all of their neighbors and beg them to take their kids.”

Full story at US News