TeachME CEUs: New Courses

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN YOUTH HARASSMENT VICTIMIZATION

This brief continuing education course, developed using information from the National Institute of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, examines technology-involved harassment within the context of other types of youth victimization and risk. Key components of peer harassment, incident characteristics, and highlights of the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence II (NatSCEV II) are discussed. In addition, implications for future research as well as for policy and practice are presented.

GLOBAL EDUCATION PRACTICES THAT PROMOTE TOLERANCE AND ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITY

The purpose of this course, which was developed using information from the Publications Office of the European Union, is to address global approaches that strive to promote tolerance, respect for diversity, and ethical responsibility in primary and secondary schools.  The course material draws on research from a range of approaches including meta-analyses, as well as quantitative and qualitative research, and the efforts to interpret such research.  The role that formal education systems play in supporting acceptance and diversity, policy recommendations, and whole school approaches that endorse understanding and sensitivity are also presented.

Free Continuing Education for Life!

Did you know that we have a program available that gives you free continuing education for life? If this sounds like something you’re interested in, just visit https://www.teachmeceus.com/account-refer.php to get all the details.

For more information, visit TeachME CEUs

 

 

TeachME: New CEU Courses

VIOLENCE AND BULLYING AMONG SCHOOL-AGED YOUTH

Youth violence is widespread in the United States and it impacts the health of individuals, families, schools, and communities.  The purpose of this brief continuing education course, developed using information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is to provide an overview of the prevalence and characteristics of teen violence and bullying and to address prevention efforts. Risk and protective factors, research findings, and strategies to help youth who are exposed to violence and bullying are also discussed.

EXPLORING THE COST OF HIGH-QUALITY EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION

Growing evidence about the benefits of high quality care for young children has led to a strong commitment at the federal and state levels to improve the quality of early care and education (ECE). Along with measures of quality, measures of implementation and cost of early childhood education are needed to shed light on what it takes to achieve high quality within a program. This continuing education course summarizes the findings of a literature review conducted as part of the Assessing the Implementation and Cost of High-Quality ECE (ECE-ICHQ) project funded by the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The project’s goal is to create a technically sound and feasible instrument that will provide consistent, systematic measures of the implementation and costs of education and care in center-based settings that serve children from birth to age five.

For more on these new courses and many more, visit TeachME CEUs

Fact Sheet: Teach to Lead

At a time when educators are raising the bar for student achievement higher than ever, the job of the American teacher has never been more critical to the success of students and to the prosperity of our communities and our country. Teachers are helping to catalyze great progress in education, including our nation’s record high school graduation rate, narrowed achievement gaps, and a larger number of young people—particularly African-American and Hispanic students—attending college. This progress is possible because—across the country—teachers are leading from their classrooms and taking on new roles to improve education for all students. The state of the teaching profession becomes stronger when teachers are empowered to lead—and when teaching is stronger, students benefit. This simple, yet powerful, idea is the basis for an initiative called Teach to Lead.

Launched in March 2014, Teach to Lead is a joint effort of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and the U.S. Department of Education to advance student outcomes by expanding opportunities for teacher leadership, particularly those that allow teachers to stay in the classroom. The initiative seeks to spur fundamental changes in the culture of schools and the teaching profession so that teachers can play a more central role in the development of policies that affect their work.

Full story of teaching to lead at ed.gov

New Data Show a Decline in School-based Bullying

New data indicate the first significant decrease in school-based bullying since the federal government began collecting that data in 2005, suggesting that efforts at the federal, state and local levels to prevent bullying may be paying off. According to new data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent for the past decade.

“As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. “The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools. Even though we’ve come a long way over the past few years in educating the public about the health and educational impacts that bullying can have on students, we still have more work to do to ensure the safety of our nation’s children.”

Full story of decline in school bullying at ed.gov

Statement from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan on 2015 Building a Grad Nation Report

More young people are graduating from high school today than ever before—and gaps in graduation rates are closing—even as standards are rising. The credit for these gains goes to educators, students, parents and community partners. Yet we know that, in today’s knowledge-based economy, a high school diploma isn’t enough. So while we should be encouraged by projections like the one in this year’s Grad Nation report, we know that more hard work remains to truly prepare all—not just some—students for success in college, careers and life. Education must be the equalizer that can help overcome the odds stacked against too many of our students.

Full story on the grad nation report at ed.gov

U.S. Department of Education Awards More Than $24.8 Million in Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Grants

The U.S. Department of Education awarded more than $24.8 million to 67 schools districts in 26 states across the country to establish or expand counseling programs. Grantees will use funds to support counseling programs in elementary and secondary schools. Specifically, the new Elementary and Secondary School Counseling grant awards will aid schools in hiring qualified mental-health professionals with the goal of expanding the range, availability, quantity and quality of counseling services. Parents of participating students will have input in the design and implementation of counseling services supported by these grants.

“School counselors are a vital resource for students and educators, and play a key role in creating safe and productive learning environments,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “These grants will enhance school-based counseling programs, which have proven to be a great source of help for students and families with mental health and emotional issues.”

Full story of ED awarding counseling grants at ed.gov

141 Students from Across the Country Named 2015 U.S. Presidential Scholars

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced the 51st class of U.S. Presidential Scholars, recognizing 141 high school seniors for their accomplishments in academics or the arts.

“Presidential Scholars demonstrate the accomplishments that can be made when students challenge themselves, set the highest standards, and commit themselves to excellence,” Duncan said. “These scholars are poised to make their mark on our nation in every field imaginable: the arts and humanities, science and technology, law and medicine, business and finance, education and government—to name a few. Their academic and artistic achievements reflect a sense of purpose that we should seek to instill in all students to prepare them for college, careers, civic responsibilities, and the challenges of today’s job market.”

The White House Commission on Presidential Scholars, appointed by President Obama, selects honored scholars annually based on their academic success, artistic excellence, essays, school evaluations and transcripts, as well as evidence of community service, leadership, and demonstrated commitment to high ideals. Of the three million students expected to graduate from high school this year, more than 4,300 candidates qualified for the 2015 awards determined by outstanding performance on the College Board SAT and ACT exams, and through nominations made by Chief State School Officers or the National YoungArts Foundation’s nationwide YoungArts™ competition.

Full story of students named to presidential scholars at ed.gov

To Get More Students Through College, Give Them Fewer Choices

How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy?

In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were 10 times more likely to actually buy.

This experiment contributed to the literature of what’s known as “the paradox of choice.” Too many choices can lead to feelings of frustration, dissatisfaction and paralysis, which is especially bad in cases where not making a choice is the worst one of all.

Full story of student choices to finish college at NPR

Secretary Duncan Announces Education Department’s First-Ever Guide for Ed Tech Developers

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced the first-ever guide for developers, startups and entrepreneurs from the department’s Office of Educational Technology (OET).

The Ed Tech Developer’s Guide: A Primer for Developers, Startups and Entrepreneurs is a free guide that addresses key questions about the education ecosystem and highlights critical needs and opportunities to develop digital tools and apps for learning.  Written with input from knowledgeable educators, developers, and researchers who were willing to share what they have learned, the guide is designed to help entrepreneurs apply technology in smart ways to solve persistent problems in education.

“Technology makes it possible for us to create a different dynamic between a teacher and a classroom full of students. It can open up limitless new ways to engage kids, support teachers and bring parents into the learning process,” Duncan said, addressing the ASU+GSV Summit 2015 in Scottsdale. “We need tools designed to help students discover who they are and what they care about, and tools that create portals to a larger world that, in the past, would have remained out of reach for far too many students.”

Full story of ed tech developers at ed.gov