America’s parents want paid family leave and affordable child care. Why can’t they get it?

CENTENNIAL, Colo. – The dilemma at dinner concerns a little less than $25 and how much it’s worth to this family of four. Whitney and Tim Phinney couldn’t have imagined how much time they would spend scrutinizing amounts like these, weighing options that never seem ideal. But then they had children in America. Tim, a stay-at-home dad in suburban Denver, is struggling. He would prefer to return to his career, but the family can’t afford full-time child care Read More

TeachME CEUs: New Courses

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN YOUTH HARASSMENT VICTIMIZATION This brief continuing education course, developed using information from the National Institute of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, examines technology-involved harassment within the context of other types of youth victimization and risk. Key components of peer harassment, incident characteristics, and highlights of the National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence II (NatSCEV II) are discussed. In addition, implications for future research as well as Read More

TeachME: New CEU Courses

VIOLENCE AND BULLYING AMONG SCHOOL-AGED YOUTH Youth violence is widespread in the United States and it impacts the health of individuals, families, schools, and communities.  The purpose of this brief continuing education course, developed using information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is to provide an overview of the prevalence and characteristics of teen violence and bullying and to address prevention efforts. Risk and protective factors, research findings, and strategies to help youth Read More

Fact Sheet: Teach to Lead

At a time when educators are raising the bar for student achievement higher than ever, the job of the American teacher has never been more critical to the success of students and to the prosperity of our communities and our country. Teachers are helping to catalyze great progress in education, including our nation’s record high school graduation rate, narrowed achievement gaps, and a larger number of young people—particularly African-American and Hispanic students—attending college. This progress Read More

New Data Show a Decline in School-based Bullying

New data indicate the first significant decrease in school-based bullying since the federal government began collecting that data in 2005, suggesting that efforts at the federal, state and local levels to prevent bullying may be paying off. According to new data from the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent for the Read More

Statement from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan on 2015 Building a Grad Nation Report

More young people are graduating from high school today than ever before—and gaps in graduation rates are closing—even as standards are rising. The credit for these gains goes to educators, students, parents and community partners. Yet we know that, in today’s knowledge-based economy, a high school diploma isn’t enough. So while we should be encouraged by projections like the one in this year’s Grad Nation report, we know that more hard work remains to truly Read More

U.S. Department of Education Awards More Than $24.8 Million in Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Grants

The U.S. Department of Education awarded more than $24.8 million to 67 schools districts in 26 states across the country to establish or expand counseling programs. Grantees will use funds to support counseling programs in elementary and secondary schools. Specifically, the new Elementary and Secondary School Counseling grant awards will aid schools in hiring qualified mental-health professionals with the goal of expanding the range, availability, quantity and quality of counseling services. Parents of participating students Read More

141 Students from Across the Country Named 2015 U.S. Presidential Scholars

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced the 51st class of U.S. Presidential Scholars, recognizing 141 high school seniors for their accomplishments in academics or the arts. “Presidential Scholars demonstrate the accomplishments that can be made when students challenge themselves, set the highest standards, and commit themselves to excellence,” Duncan said. “These scholars are poised to make their mark on our nation in every field imaginable: the arts and humanities, science and technology, law and Read More

To Get More Students Through College, Give Them Fewer Choices

How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy? In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were 10 times more likely to actually buy. This experiment contributed to the literature of what’s known as “the paradox of choice.” Too many choices can lead to feelings Read More

Secretary Duncan Announces Education Department’s First-Ever Guide for Ed Tech Developers

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today announced the first-ever guide for developers, startups and entrepreneurs from the department’s Office of Educational Technology (OET). The Ed Tech Developer’s Guide: A Primer for Developers, Startups and Entrepreneurs is a free guide that addresses key questions about the education ecosystem and highlights critical needs and opportunities to develop digital tools and apps for learning.  Written with input from knowledgeable educators, developers, and researchers who were willing to share what Read More