Sibling Bullying: What’s the Big Deal?

Sibling bullying is a type of violence that is prevalent in the lives of most children, but little is known about it, researchers say. Clemson University psychology professor Robin Kowalski said the phenomenon has been overlooked. Kowalski and and co-author Jessica Skinner explored the extent to which sibling bullying is viewed to be normal and the perceived differences between victims and perpetrators. They recently published their findings in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. The purpose Read More

ADHD Linked To Inner Ear Problems; Could Studying Poor Hearing Lead To New, Innovative ADHD Treatment?

According to Discovery Fit & Health, an inner ear dysfunction in children could cause neurological changes that lead to behavioral abnormalities related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Therefore, adolescents who suffer from inner ear problems could be at risk of developing ADHD, according to a recent study. Findings published online in the journal Science reveal that children and adolescents with severe inner ear problems could develop behavioral problems, such as hyperactivity. When a Ph.D. Read More

Mental Health in High School: Teach Students Link between Thinking Patterns, Emotions & Behavior

Adding a mental health component to school-based health education programs could enhance health behaviors, reduce depression and improve grades. Researchers from The Ohio State University College of Nursing found that a program called COPE: (Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment) Healthy Lifestyles TEEN (Thinking, Emotions, Exercise, Nutrition) had a beneficial outcome for several health and behavioral factors. The high school health classes used an intervention that emphasized building cognitive behavioral skills in addition to nutrition and Read More

Psychology’s answer to trolling and online abuse

Do we each harbor a dark passenger? A malevolent psychopath? A fragile narcissist? Contrary to popular belief, decades of psychological research shows that anyone is capable of aggression, cruelty and violence. The “self” is a murky mixture of light and shade. Lately the dark side seems to be winning. On Thursday, Downing Street called for a boycott on the website ask.fm following the tragic death of Hannah Smith. Meanwhile, the barrage of threats directed at Read More

9 Signs You’re At Risk For Domestic Violence

Last weekend, celebrity abusers Chris Brown and Oscar Pistorius popped up in headlines again, but this time it wasn’t for their respective assault convictions and murder trials. Instead, Brown was lauded for his performance at the Billboard Music Awards. Brown’s ex-girlfriend Rihanna, whom he attacked during an argument in 2009, skipped the show. Pistorius, meanwhile, announced through his manager that he will not compete in races for the rest of the year. His decision was Read More

People With Borderline Personality Disorder May Misinterpret Facial Emotions

Symptoms of borderline personality disorder often mimic traits of other psychiatric disorders, complicating diagnosis and treatment. But researchers in Canada say they have identified a characteristic that may be unique to borderline personality disorder: a tendency to misinterpret emotions expressed by the face.   “They have difficulty processing facial emotions and will see a negative emotion on a neutral face,” said Anthony Ruocco, a clinical neuropsychologist and assistant professor at the University of Toronto. “This Read More

12 Ways Your Pet Can Improve Your Mental Health!

When I am feeling down and weary, and I can barely lift myself off the couch, my dog comes to my rescue. She cuddles with me, then motivates me to get up, dressed, and out the door for a walk or some play time. Somehow my fur-baby even gets me to smile, no matter how miserable or stressed I feel. I am not alone. It turns out that all pets, not just therapy pets, can Read More

Foster Care a Sound Choice for Some Maltreated Children

Newspaper articles, TV shows and books are filled with horror stories of children placed in foster care. A new study bucks that trend by showing out-of-home placements can improve the emotional health of some youths who have been maltreated by a parent. The study, led by Ann-Marie Conn, PhD, general pediatric academic fellow at University of Rochester Medical Center in New York, will be presented Monday, May 6, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual Read More

Dialectical Behavior Therapy: Not Just for Mental Illness

When I was studying psychology in college, I remember having a particular distaste for the behavioral approaches of B.F. Skinner. Defining the sacred depths of being human by behavioral impulses akin to a mouse motivated by cheese was not for me. I was much more into psychoanalytic therapy and Jung. How then later did I come to embrace cognitive behavioral and related therapies that spell out that we are, essentially, just a mess of behaviors Read More

Using Texting to Improve Teen Health

A new study leverages teens’ relationships with cell phones and text messages as a method to enhance health literacy and improve health behaviors. According to the Nielsen consumer research group, U.S. teens receive an average of 3,417 text messages per month or a whopping 114 texts per day. Teens also have notoriously have poor diets, with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting that high school students’ consumption of fruit and vegetables is, Read More