Race and School Discipline

BLACK STUDENTS WITH disabilities are disciplined more often than their white peers, pushing them into the school-to-prison pipeline at higher rates, a new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights shows – just the latest finding to stoke an ongoing debate over the role race plays in school discipline.

“Ignoring the reality that kids can be harmed and that it is our educators’ obligation to ensure that they are not harmed has an obvious impact on students of color in particular and students with disabilities in particular,” Catherine Lhamon, chairwoman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, says. “When we know that turning away from specific harms to specific identity groups will hurt their educational opportunity and their rights in schools, we are taking steps we ought not to take.”

The 224-page report draws on data from the Department of Education and its Office for Civil Rights to argue that students of color don’t commit more offenses than their white peers but receive “substantially more” discipline than them, as well as harder and longer punishments for similar offenses. At the same time, the report underscores, data shows that students with disabilities are about twice as likely to be suspended compared to those without disabilities.

Full story at US News