New guidelines offer hope for those with binge-eating disorder

New Guidelines For Binge-EatingAt one time or another, Jana Begor has tried most of the commercially advertised diets, not to mention the grapefruit diet and the cabbage soup diet. She became a vegan. She tried the raw food diet.

Sometimes, she lost weight. And then she regained it.

“I need to learn how to eat,” said Begor, 68, a real estate agent who lives in Calaveras County, Calif. “Why am I not able to control my eating? What is going on that I can’t put my fork down or step away from the refrigerator? I start eating, and I don’t stop.”

She was recently diagnosed with binge-eating disorder, a condition involving compulsive, out-of-control episodes of eating followed by shame, guilt and depression.

It’s the country’s most prevalent eating disorder, shared by more than 8.5 million Americans: Binge-eating disorder affects more people than do bulimia and anorexia combined, yet experts say it has long been underdiagnosed as a mental health issue.

Full story on guidelines for binge-eating at Bradenton Herald

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