Coronavirus Brings ‘Homework Gap’ to the Forefront

Even before he launched his distance learning classroom last week, middle school band director Blake Bogan knew he faced some unique challenges. “Most of my job is listening to students and helping them mix and blend their sound with their peers,” says Bogan, who teaches at Raceland Middle School in Raceland, La. It’s a rural town of roughly 10,000 about an hour’s drive southwest of New Orleans. Since perfecting the mix and blend of a Read More

9 Ways Schools Will Look Different When (And If) They Reopen

Three-quarters of U.S. states have now officially closed their schools for the rest of the academic year. While remote learning continues, summer is a question mark, and attention is already starting to turn to next fall. Recently, governors including California’s Gavin Newsom and New York’s Andrew Cuomo have started to talk about what school reopening might look like. And a federal government plan for reopening, according to The Washington Post, says that getting kids back in Read More

Secretary DeVos Releases Statement on ‘Inexcusable’ NAEP Results

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released the following statement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2018 Civics, Geography, and U.S. History Assessments for 8th Graders: “America’s antiquated approach to education is creating a generation of future leaders who will not have a foundational understanding of what makes this country exceptional. We cannot continue to excuse this problem away. Instead, we need to fundamentally rethink education in America. It is the only way Read More

Why Teachers Are Key in Boosting Girls’ Interest in Math

Many of America’s top math students may be naturally good at numbers, but when it comes to the appeal of the subject, a vast number of them point to teachers as being the most influential in boosting their interest. That’s the finding of a national survey of 1,253 11th and 12th graders, conducted by the Philadelphia-based Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) that queried the students about their views on math and STEM. The students are participants in this Read More

How Colleges Are Grading Students During Coronavirus

When Carolynn van Arsdale, a senior at the University of Vermont, was forced to leave her campus amid coronavirus concerns last month, it caused a lot of complications. ” I was forced to move out of my apartment building and move into my mother’s house in a different state,” she said. “I lost one of my jobs … and I’ve been struggling with my mental health. All of these stresses have challenged me in being Read More

Jacqueline Woodson: What Is The Hidden Power Of Slow Reading?

Novelist Jacqueline Woodson is a slow reader. Taking her time lets her savor each word, brings her closer to each story, and it lets her pay respect to her ancestors who weren’t allowed to read. About Jacqueline Woodson Jacqueline Woodson is the author of nearly thirty books for children and adolescents, including many award winners like Brown Girl Dreaming and Miracle’s Boys. From 2018 to 2019, she served as the Library of Congress’s National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, and Read More

Secretary DeVos Releases New Resources for Educators, Local Leaders on K-12 Flexibilities, Student Privacy, and Educating Students with Disabilities During Coronavirus Outbreak

WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos issued new resources today that will assist education leaders in protecting student privacy and ensuring students with disabilities continue to receive services required under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in the event of school closures due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The Education Department also released importantinformation for K-12 educators on flexibilities the Department could grant when it comes to the accountability standards required by law under the Elementary and Secondary Read More

How scaffolding lessons can strengthen critical thinking development

Assigning students real-world projects can help them build critical thinking skills, and incorporating scaffolding can help guide them further while also deepening these skill sets, seeing them in a context of how they might potentially be used when faced with solving real-world problems at work or in the classroom. Scaffolding is used at the university level, for example, to help students strengthen the skills they’ll need when they move on into the workplace, noted Lynn Read More

Paraeducator Raises Funds for Students Affected by Puerto Rico Earthquakes

Students in Puerto Rico were supposed to return to school in early January after winter break, but after hundreds of earthquakes and aftershocks rocked the island, dozens of schools, buildings, homes and businesses were reduced to piles of cement blocks and rubble. The series of tremors, which started December 28 and reached a fever pitch with a massive 6.4 quake January 7th, has left more than 8,000 Puerto Ricans displaced from their homes. Sleeping in Read More

Supreme Court Case May Open Door to Vouchers Nationwide

Betsy DeVos’ unwavering support of private school vouchers long precedes her tenure as U.S. Education Secretary.  Despite being supported by the resources and influence of the federal government, however, DeVos’ efforts to expand vouchers legislatively have been stymied by lack of support in Congress (even when the GOP held majorities in both houses) and stubborn public opposition. American voters have rejected programs that transfer scarce taxpayer dollars away from public schools to pay for private school tuition. For champions Read More