How some colleges plan to reopen this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic

Some universities across the country have started to reveal plans to open their campuses in the fall, after the coronavirus pandemic forced universities across the nation to shut down in favor of remote learning. The University of Notre Dame announced earlier this week it will welcome students back to campus this summer, starting the semester two weeks earlier than usual. Students there will skip fall break, allowing them to complete the semester by Thanksgiving. The university hopes that by Read More

Survey: Children’s loss of social ties, learning top parents’ closure concerns

Parents are more concerned about their children missing social interactions at school and with peers than they are someone in their family getting sick with the coronavirus, according to a new survey released Wednesday. Fifty-nine percent of the more than 3,600 parents and guardians responding to the nonprofit Learning Heroes’ survey said their children’s lack of in-person connections was currently their top pandemic-related concern, with 57% saying they are worried about COVID-19 affecting a family member. Making Read More

School Superintendents Dismiss White House, Will Follow Leaked CDC Guidance on Reopening

SCHOOL DISTRICT superintendents – those responsible for making decisions about how and when to reopen schools – are planning to follow detailed guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that was shelved by the White House last month instead of the official guidance published Thursday. Education officials have been clamoring for more thorough direction from the Trump administration as to how and when they can safely reopen schools, but the long-awaited CDC guidance published to Read More

NEA Hosts Tele-Town Hall to Mobilize Support for Coronavirus Relief Bill

The message of NEA’s “We Rise Together” campaign, a national call to demand Congress pass the HEROES Act to help stabilize education funding, couldn’t be any clearer: “If we don’t do something, it’s going to get worse,” cautioned NEA President Lily Eskelsen García, during a national tele-town hall with Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), Rep. Jahana Hayes (D-Conn.), and award-winning actor Bradley Whitford, as well as thousands of education activists. The group underscored throughout the hour-long call that the “something” is to take collective action to urge Read More

Can’t Leave The House? Try Playing Competitive Video Games

For millions of college students around the country, coronavirus lockdowns effectively canceled their hobbies and extracurriculars. But that’s not the case for Madison Cragle, a graphic design major at the State University of New York at Canton. She’s co-captain of her school’s Super Smash Bros. Ultimate team — an esports team. That’s right, varsity video games. “There’s a joke going around that once the quarantine ends, everyone’s going to be like a thousand times better Read More

AP Tests Begin Online And At Home — But Not For Everyone

Starting Monday, Advanced Placement exams, which test high schoolers’ knowledge of college material, will take an unusual form. The high-anxiety, college credit tests normally last three hours and are taken in person. But this year, in response to disruptions from the coronavirus outbreak, the College Board, which administers AP exams, shortened the tests to 45 minutes and moved them online. The new format has raised questions about fairness. For many students, changing the test site from Read More

Coronavirus Brings ‘Homework Gap’ to the Forefront

Even before he launched his distance learning classroom last week, middle school band director Blake Bogan knew he faced some unique challenges. “Most of my job is listening to students and helping them mix and blend their sound with their peers,” says Bogan, who teaches at Raceland Middle School in Raceland, La. It’s a rural town of roughly 10,000 about an hour’s drive southwest of New Orleans. Since perfecting the mix and blend of a Read More

9 Ways Schools Will Look Different When (And If) They Reopen

Three-quarters of U.S. states have now officially closed their schools for the rest of the academic year. While remote learning continues, summer is a question mark, and attention is already starting to turn to next fall. Recently, governors including California’s Gavin Newsom and New York’s Andrew Cuomo have started to talk about what school reopening might look like. And a federal government plan for reopening, according to The Washington Post, says that getting kids back in Read More

Secretary DeVos Releases Statement on ‘Inexcusable’ NAEP Results

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released the following statement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2018 Civics, Geography, and U.S. History Assessments for 8th Graders: “America’s antiquated approach to education is creating a generation of future leaders who will not have a foundational understanding of what makes this country exceptional. We cannot continue to excuse this problem away. Instead, we need to fundamentally rethink education in America. It is the only way Read More

Why Teachers Are Key in Boosting Girls’ Interest in Math

Many of America’s top math students may be naturally good at numbers, but when it comes to the appeal of the subject, a vast number of them point to teachers as being the most influential in boosting their interest. That’s the finding of a national survey of 1,253 11th and 12th graders, conducted by the Philadelphia-based Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) that queried the students about their views on math and STEM. The students are participants in this Read More