Can’t Leave The House? Try Playing Competitive Video Games

For millions of college students around the country, coronavirus lockdowns effectively canceled their hobbies and extracurriculars. But that’s not the case for Madison Cragle, a graphic design major at the State University of New York at Canton. She’s co-captain of her school’s Super Smash Bros. Ultimate team — an esports team. That’s right, varsity video games. “There’s a joke going around that once the quarantine ends, everyone’s going to be like a thousand times better Read More

AP Tests Begin Online And At Home — But Not For Everyone

Starting Monday, Advanced Placement exams, which test high schoolers’ knowledge of college material, will take an unusual form. The high-anxiety, college credit tests normally last three hours and are taken in person. But this year, in response to disruptions from the coronavirus outbreak, the College Board, which administers AP exams, shortened the tests to 45 minutes and moved them online. The new format has raised questions about fairness. For many students, changing the test site from Read More

PISA results highlight US teens’ limited financial knowledge

U.S. 15-year-olds understand some common principles of money management and can make simple financial plans and solve “routine” problems related to budgeting, according to the latest results of an international financial literacy assessment. But results of the 2018 Program for International Student Assessment in financial literacy — conducted in 20 countries — shows they’re not as skilled at interpreting complex documents, such as bank statements, or looking at the long-range consequences of financial decisions. On Read More

Schools Face Nightmare Scenario After Coronavirus Crisis

SCHOOL OFFICIALS FROM the country’s biggest school districts recently sent a message to Congress: Inject the K-12 system with a serious infusion of cash ahead of what forecasters say is the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, or brace for the catastrophic results of hallowed out school budgets. “Dark clouds are forming on the educational horizon that will spell disaster if Congress does not intervene,” 62 superintendents from school districts like New York City, Los Read More

Ready for what? New research weighs high schools’ ‘promotion power’

A few years ago, Jessica Baghian, the assistant superintendent and chief academic policy officer for the Louisiana Department of Education, was speaking on a panel at the Association for Education Finance and Policy conference. She said she was “riffing on” her frustration over K-12 accountability systems that fail to communicate what happens to students after they graduate from high school. “It felt like we were missing an opportunity to tell schools more about what happens to Read More

9 Ways Schools Will Look Different When (And If) They Reopen

Three-quarters of U.S. states have now officially closed their schools for the rest of the academic year. While remote learning continues, summer is a question mark, and attention is already starting to turn to next fall. Recently, governors including California’s Gavin Newsom and New York’s Andrew Cuomo have started to talk about what school reopening might look like. And a federal government plan for reopening, according to The Washington Post, says that getting kids back in Read More

Secretary DeVos Releases Statement on ‘Inexcusable’ NAEP Results

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released the following statement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2018 Civics, Geography, and U.S. History Assessments for 8th Graders: “America’s antiquated approach to education is creating a generation of future leaders who will not have a foundational understanding of what makes this country exceptional. We cannot continue to excuse this problem away. Instead, we need to fundamentally rethink education in America. It is the only way Read More

Why Teachers Are Key in Boosting Girls’ Interest in Math

Many of America’s top math students may be naturally good at numbers, but when it comes to the appeal of the subject, a vast number of them point to teachers as being the most influential in boosting their interest. That’s the finding of a national survey of 1,253 11th and 12th graders, conducted by the Philadelphia-based Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) that queried the students about their views on math and STEM. The students are participants in this Read More

Jacqueline Woodson: What Is The Hidden Power Of Slow Reading?

Novelist Jacqueline Woodson is a slow reader. Taking her time lets her savor each word, brings her closer to each story, and it lets her pay respect to her ancestors who weren’t allowed to read. About Jacqueline Woodson Jacqueline Woodson is the author of nearly thirty books for children and adolescents, including many award winners like Brown Girl Dreaming and Miracle’s Boys. From 2018 to 2019, she served as the Library of Congress’s National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, and Read More

Study: New Hampshire Lacks Pandemic Planning Laws for Schools

AS SCHOOLS CLOSE AND turn toward virtual learning amid the exponential spread of the coronavirus, nearly every U.S. state has laws that allow for schools to plan how to respond to pandemics. Just one state doesn’t, according to a March report from Child Trends: New Hampshire. The education research organization’s report, which was developed by studying state health and education codes in LexisNexis and Westlaw, found that the laws in most states allow for flexibility when it Read More