PISA results highlight US teens’ limited financial knowledge

U.S. 15-year-olds understand some common principles of money management and can make simple financial plans and solve “routine” problems related to budgeting, according to the latest results of an international financial literacy assessment. But results of the 2018 Program for International Student Assessment in financial literacy — conducted in 20 countries — shows they’re not as skilled at interpreting complex documents, such as bank statements, or looking at the long-range consequences of financial decisions. On Read More

Teachers Union Blasts Trump, Lays Out Plan for Reopening Schools

THE AMERICAN FEDERATION of Teachers, the 1.7-million member teachers union, issued guidance Wednesday for how and when schools should safely reopen, slamming President Donald Trump for his comments to governors suggesting they look at opening schools. “Our blueprint serves as a stark contrast to the conflicting guidance, bluster and lies of the Trump administration,” said AFT president Randi Weingarten. The 20-page guidance, which Weingarten said would evolve as the status of the coronavirus epidemic evolves, includes five major Read More

Secretary DeVos Releases Statement on ‘Inexcusable’ NAEP Results

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released the following statement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2018 Civics, Geography, and U.S. History Assessments for 8th Graders: “America’s antiquated approach to education is creating a generation of future leaders who will not have a foundational understanding of what makes this country exceptional. We cannot continue to excuse this problem away. Instead, we need to fundamentally rethink education in America. It is the only way Read More

How Innovative Educators Are Engaging Students Online

When governors and state superintendents closed schools because of the coronavirus, it took teachers and faculty a matter of days—and in many cases a few hours—to move their classes online. Despite the differences between online learning and face-to-face learning, the level of commitment and creativity from educators is stronger than ever. Cecily Corcoran, a middle school art teacher from Arlington Public Schools in Virginia, was ahead of the online learning game because she made it her personal goal earlier in school year to update her Read More

Darling-Hammond: COVID-19 brings ‘central importance of public education back to people’s minds’

Few education researchers have had as much influence on educational policy and practice over the past quarter century than Linda Darling-Hammond. A former teacher and school founder, the Stanford University scholar is president and CEO of the Learning Policy Institute, and last year, she was appointed president of the California State Board of Education. In this Q&A, Darling-Hammond discusses the state board’s response to the COVID-19 crisis, how school closures are affecting her research interests and the Read More

Jacqueline Woodson: What Is The Hidden Power Of Slow Reading?

Novelist Jacqueline Woodson is a slow reader. Taking her time lets her savor each word, brings her closer to each story, and it lets her pay respect to her ancestors who weren’t allowed to read. About Jacqueline Woodson Jacqueline Woodson is the author of nearly thirty books for children and adolescents, including many award winners like Brown Girl Dreaming and Miracle’s Boys. From 2018 to 2019, she served as the Library of Congress’s National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, and Read More

Life Skills a Powerful Tool in School-Based Drug Prevention Programs

Generation after generation, parents and educators have worked to steer kids away from drugs and alcohol. But until recently, there was little research to show them the most effective ways of doing so. In the past, school-based prevention programs mostly attempted to scare young people away from drugs. Kids of the ‘90s may recall a teacher popping in a VHS tape that showed a teen revved up on PCP. The video ends with the teen jumping off the roof of Read More

How scaffolding lessons can strengthen critical thinking development

Assigning students real-world projects can help them build critical thinking skills, and incorporating scaffolding can help guide them further while also deepening these skill sets, seeing them in a context of how they might potentially be used when faced with solving real-world problems at work or in the classroom. Scaffolding is used at the university level, for example, to help students strengthen the skills they’ll need when they move on into the workplace, noted Lynn Read More

Paraeducator Raises Funds for Students Affected by Puerto Rico Earthquakes

Students in Puerto Rico were supposed to return to school in early January after winter break, but after hundreds of earthquakes and aftershocks rocked the island, dozens of schools, buildings, homes and businesses were reduced to piles of cement blocks and rubble. The series of tremors, which started December 28 and reached a fever pitch with a massive 6.4 quake January 7th, has left more than 8,000 Puerto Ricans displaced from their homes. Sleeping in Read More

Supreme Court Case May Open Door to Vouchers Nationwide

Betsy DeVos’ unwavering support of private school vouchers long precedes her tenure as U.S. Education Secretary.  Despite being supported by the resources and influence of the federal government, however, DeVos’ efforts to expand vouchers legislatively have been stymied by lack of support in Congress (even when the GOP held majorities in both houses) and stubborn public opposition. American voters have rejected programs that transfer scarce taxpayer dollars away from public schools to pay for private school tuition. For champions Read More