NCAA Plans To Allow College Athletes To Get Paid For Use Of Their Names, Images

In a surprise move, the NCAA says it intends to allow college athletes to earn compensation — but it says it’s only starting to work out the details of how that would take place. The organization’s board of governors said Tuesday that it had voted unanimously to permit student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.

“We must embrace change to provide the best possible experience for college athletes,” said Michael Drake, the NCAA board chair who is also president of Ohio State University. In a statement, Drake stressed the need for “additional flexibility” in the NCAA’s approach.

Drake added, “This modernization for the future is a natural extension of the numerous steps NCAA members have taken in recent years to improve support for student-athletes, including full cost of attendance and guaranteed scholarships.”

Full story at NPR

GAO Finds Loose Oversight of Scholarship Tax Credits

STATE OFFICIALS IN Arizona and Pennsylvania provide no oversight or monitoring of the private schools that participate in the tax credit scholarship programs they operate, a new report from the Government Accountability Office found, confirming long-standing concerns of congressional Democrats pushing back against the Trump administration’s pursuit of a federal tax credit program.

In a deep dive on the three states with the largest tax credit scholarship programs – Arizona, Florida and Pennsylvania – investigators with the nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress found that the states differ in how they oversee participating private schools. Specifically, they found that all four of Arizona’s tax credit scholarship programs and one of two Pennsylvania programs generally rely on the individual scholarship-granting organizations to confirm that schools comply with program requirements.

Full story at US News

How to Manage Discord Over Student Discipline

The principal-teacher relationship faces a lot of potential stressors, from dealing with parents to disagreements over who has to do lunch duty.

But perhaps nothing causes more friction between principals and teachers than how to discipline students.

Teachers and principals alike—although to varying degrees—rank student discipline as the biggest source of disagreement between the two groups, according to a survey by the Education Week Research Center.

Full story at Education Week

U.S. Department of Education Announces New Grant Awards to Address School Safety and Improve Access to Mental Health Services

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos today announced $71.6 million in new funding to enhance safety in schools and improve student access to mental health resources. The U.S. Department of Education made the awards under four grant programs, which support recommendations identified in the final report issued by the Federal Commission on School Safety.

“Our nation’s schools must be safe places to learn, where students feel connected and supported,” said Secretary DeVos. “These grants allow local leaders to tailor their approach to school safety and mental health in ways that meet their students’ individual needs and their particular school’s unique challenges.”

Full story at Department of Education

Kids in poor, urban schools learn just as much as others

Schools serving disadvantaged and minority children teach as much to their students as those serving more advantaged kids, according to a new nationwide study.

The results may seem surprising, given that student test scores are normally higher in suburban and wealthier school districts than they are in urban districts serving mostly disadvantaged and minority children.

But those test scores speak more to what happens outside the classroom than how schools themselves are performing, said Douglas Downey, lead author of the new study and professor of sociology at The Ohio State University.

“We found that if you look at how much students are learning during the school year, the difference between schools serving mostly advantaged students and those serving mostly disadvantaged students is essentially zero,” Downey said.

Full story at Science Daily

What’s the Best State for Teachers? This Year’s Answer Might Surprise You

Seeking a stable teacher salary and a healthy work environment? A new analysis suggests heading north.

This year, North Dakota took first place in personal finance site WalletHub’s annual ranking of the best and worst states to be a teacher.

The other states rounding out the top five spots this year?

  • New Jersey
  • Pennsylvania
  • Wyoming
  • Connecticut 

The ranking is based mostly on what the website calls “opportunity and competition”—factors including the average salary and starting pay for teachers, potential for income growth over the course of a career, pension, tenure protections, and job competition in the state. Scores on these metrics make up 70 percent of a state’s rating. 

Full story at Education Week

Chicago Schools Investigation Prompts News Look at Sex Abuse in K-12 Schools

THE DEPARTMENT OF Education will oversee a sweeping redesign of the Title IX procedures in Chicago Public Schools to protect students from future sexual assault and abuse, putting to rest a years-long investigation that uncovered thousands of mishandled complaints in what officials described as “deeply disturbing” and likely the most comprehensive investigation ever undertaken on sexual violence in a major public school system.

“Over the last several years, American have become increasingly aware of sexual violence on colleges campuses,” Kenneth Marcus, assistant secretary for civil rights, said Thursday. “This may be a wake-up call that the problem exists on elementary and secondary schools as well. This is something we cannot tolerate.”

The investigation, which examined complaints dating back to 2012, uncovered 2,800 student-on-student sexual harassment complaints and 280 adult-on-student complaints at more than 400 schools in Chicago, the nation’s third-largest school district.

Full story at US News

You Can’t Hit Unsend: How A Social Media Scandal Unfolded At Harvard

Shortly after the 9-11 attacks, a photo made its way around the internet. It showed a man standing on the observation deck of the World Trade Center in New York City. His face is expressionless, unsmiling. He’s wearing a knitted black cap, sunglasses and an unzipped parka. Behind him, there’s a deep blue sky and views of Manhattan and the Hudson river. But there’s something else behind him too — a plane. It’s headed straight toward the tower. Rumor had it that the man died that day and his camera was later pulled from the rubble.

It’s an amazing shot and an amazing story, and it’s totally false.

The man is Peter Guzli and he’s Hungarian. The famous picture was snapped several years before the terrorist attacks.

After 9-11, Guzli edited the photo and added in the plane. He then emailed the image to a few friends “as a joke.” Those friends shared the image with their friends, and their friends shared it with more friends, and soon, the photo was everywhere.

Full story at NPR

U.S. Department of Education Finalizes Regulations to Protect Student Borrowers, Hold Higher Education Institutions Accountable and Save Taxpayers $11.1 Billion Over 10 Years

WASHINGTON—Today, the U.S. Department of Education finalized regulations that will protect student borrowers, hold higher education institutions accountable and provide financial protections to taxpayers. The Institutional Accountability regulations, posted on the Department’s website today, come after more than two years of deliberations, public hearings, negotiated rulemaking with a wide variety of higher education stakeholders and careful consideration of tens of thousands of public comments.

“If a school defrauds students, it must be held accountable,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. “There is no place for fraud in higher education, and it will not be tolerated by this Administration. From the recent college admissions scandal and intentional misrepresentations by schools to boost their U.S. News & World Report rankings to fraudulent marketing practices from proprietary intuitions, too many institutions of higher education are falling short. The new regulations are aimed at preventing this behavior because students deserve better, and all institutions must do better.

Full story at the US Department of Education

Education in the Age of Outrage

As an openly bisexual woman who did not have a single female professor throughout my college and postgraduate education in any subject, and who faced harassment and abuse, as well as downright sabotage in graduate school, I am sympathetic to efforts on campuses to give voice and equal power to groups that have been historically excluded and silenced.

Now, as a philosophy professor, I am part of perhaps the most male-dominated (and arguably least feminist-friendly) discipline in the humanities, and have dedicated much of my career to mentoring women and students of color. I understand that injustice and inequality remain firmly in place, and in order to eliminate it, much more work remains to be done.

Full story at the New York Post