With Schools Closed, Kids With Disabilities Are More Vulnerable Than Ever

With school closed, Marla Murasko begins her morning getting her 14-year-old son, Jacob, dressed and ready for the day. They have a daily check-in: How are you doing? How are you feeling? Next, they consult the colorful, hourly schedule she has pinned on the fridge. Jacob, who has Down syndrome, loves routine. So this daily routine is important. Schools in Hopkinton, Mass., are closed until May 4th, so Jacob’s morning academic lesson — which according to Read More

U.S. Department of Education Releases Webinar, Fact Sheet for Protecting Students’ Civil Rights During COVID-19 Response

WASHINGTON — The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Education released today a webinar on ensuring web accessibility for students with disabilities for schools utilizing online learning during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. In addition, OCR published a fact sheet for education leaders on how to protect students’ civil rights as school leaders take steps to keep students safe and secure. These resources will assist education leaders in making distance learning accessible to students with disabilities Read More

Life Skills a Powerful Tool in School-Based Drug Prevention Programs

Generation after generation, parents and educators have worked to steer kids away from drugs and alcohol. But until recently, there was little research to show them the most effective ways of doing so. In the past, school-based prevention programs mostly attempted to scare young people away from drugs. Kids of the ‘90s may recall a teacher popping in a VHS tape that showed a teen revved up on PCP. The video ends with the teen jumping off the roof of Read More

Tuition-Free College Programs Gain Momentum

TIMARI RAY IS THE FIRST of her generation to attend college, and she says this wouldn’t be possible without the Tennessee Promise scholarship. “It keeps me motivated because I know that if I didn’t, you know, pass this class or if I fail the class or dropped out or anything, I know that I would literally lose everything,” says Ray, a freshman seeking her associate degree at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee. She is speaking about Tennessee’s Read More

Following Rally, Virginia Educators Push to Restore Collective Bargaining

Thousands of educators from across Virginia stood up on Monday to exercising their choice to join a union. In front of the Capitol building in Richmond, they lobbied their legislators to fund their public schools, fight for increased pay, and support their freedom to collectively bargain. After decades of draconian laws forcing teachers out of the profession, educators in Virginia now enjoy a pro-public education majority in the General Assembly for the first time in Read More

Education Dept. Unveils Fix For Student Loan Program’s ‘Bureaucratic Nightmare’

Public servants with student loans were furious, and the U.S. Department of Education heard them. The department revealed Thursday that it will simplify the process for borrowers to apply for an expansion of the troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. The move comes after a damning Government Accountability Office review, first reported by NPR. In that 2019 review, the federal watchdog found that during the expansion program’s first year, the department turned away 99% of applicants. The Read More

Supreme Court Case May Open Door to Vouchers Nationwide

Betsy DeVos’ unwavering support of private school vouchers long precedes her tenure as U.S. Education Secretary.  Despite being supported by the resources and influence of the federal government, however, DeVos’ efforts to expand vouchers legislatively have been stymied by lack of support in Congress (even when the GOP held majorities in both houses) and stubborn public opposition. American voters have rejected programs that transfer scarce taxpayer dollars away from public schools to pay for private school tuition. For champions Read More