Report: Most districts lacked clear plans in shift to remote learning

It’s almost a given that districts will continue some level of distance learning this fall — either to maintain social distancing, respond to future coronavirus outbreaks, give families more choice or a combination of all of those reasons. District leaders can now begin planning “to align the resources, create teacher professional development and assess community priorities to design plans for the fall that have high expectations for each student’s learning and are responsive to each Read More

Colleges Must Mandate Face Masks on Reopened Campuses, Union Says

The required use of face masks on campuses, sanitation stations in every college classroom and office, and comprehensive COVID-19 testing and tracing programs are a few of the recommendations made this week by a United Faculty of Florida (UFF) committee, which stepped into the debate around reopening campuses with a detailed 13-page report of best practices. The intention is to be helpful, and to make sure the voices of students, faculty, staff, and health experts are Read More

U.K. Schools Begin Reopening Despite Coronavirus Concerns

Grade schools in the United Kingdom began a staged reopening Monday, welcoming back the first wave of students since closing in late March to all but vulnerable children and children of essential workers. The reopening comes as the government begins to ease other restrictions, now allowing groups of up to six people from different households to convene in private outdoor settings like gardens with appropriate social distance. The rate of daily coronavirus cases in the U.K. is on Read More

‘A different kind of horrific’ for K-12 as states anticipate revenue shortfalls

Threatened with budget cuts from falling tax revenues on one hand and unprecedented expenses on the other, superintendents are faced with difficult decisions regarding layoffs and program cuts this fall. While some states are now revising budget projections and making plans to rework the numbers, others have stayed silent on whether, or how deeply, K-12 will take a hit. Some leaders have claimed their districts will be shielded, at least for the time being, from Read More

‘Feels Very Anticlimatic’: Seniors Reflect On Ending High School Amid The Pandemic

Prom portraits are often windows into the past, capturing a moment in time with a special person, or friends you’ve lost touch with. It’s a celebration of hard work; a well-earned break from studying and stress. Frozen in time — often to the delight and amusement, decades later, of future generations — are cultural trends in fashion and hair : Why did you pick that dress? Sneakers with a suit –really? Yet for the class Read More

PISA results highlight US teens’ limited financial knowledge

U.S. 15-year-olds understand some common principles of money management and can make simple financial plans and solve “routine” problems related to budgeting, according to the latest results of an international financial literacy assessment. But results of the 2018 Program for International Student Assessment in financial literacy — conducted in 20 countries — shows they’re not as skilled at interpreting complex documents, such as bank statements, or looking at the long-range consequences of financial decisions. On Read More

Secretary DeVos Announces $3 Billion in Emergency Education Block Grants for Governors

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced today that nearly $3 billion will quickly be made available to governors to ensure education continues for students of all ages impacted by the coronavirus national emergency. The Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) Fund, authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, is an extraordinarily flexible “emergency block grant” designed to enable governors to decide how best to meet the needs of students, schools (including charter Read More

Coronavirus Public Health Emergency Underscores Need for Department of Education’s Proposed Distance Learning Rules

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos proposed new rules today that would govern distance learning for higher education students. Although work on the proposed Distance Learning and Innovation regulation started more than a year ago, the COVID-19 National Emergency underscores the need for reform and for all educational institutions to have a robust capacity to teach remotely. “With our support, colleges and universities were among the first to transition to online and distance learning so learning could continue during Read More

‘Panic-gogy’: Teaching Online Classes During The Coronavirus Pandemic

As colleges across the country pivot online on very short notice, there are a host of complications — from laptops and Internet access to mental health and financial needs. Digital learning experts have some surprising advice: do less. “Please Do A Bad Job Of Putting Your Courses Online” is the title of one popular blog post by Rebecca Barrett-Fox, an assistant professor of sociology at Arkansas State University. Her point: “your class is not the highest priority of their or your Read More

Tuition-Free College Programs Gain Momentum

TIMARI RAY IS THE FIRST of her generation to attend college, and she says this wouldn’t be possible without the Tennessee Promise scholarship. “It keeps me motivated because I know that if I didn’t, you know, pass this class or if I fail the class or dropped out or anything, I know that I would literally lose everything,” says Ray, a freshman seeking her associate degree at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee. She is speaking about Tennessee’s Read More