About TeachMe Professional Development

TeachMe CEUs provides professional development courses to teachers and educators throughout the United States. We blog about education, education reform and education technology. As well as articles of interest regarding the health and well being of our youth.

Chicago Schools Investigation Prompts News Look at Sex Abuse in K-12 Schools

THE DEPARTMENT OF Education will oversee a sweeping redesign of the Title IX procedures in Chicago Public Schools to protect students from future sexual assault and abuse, putting to rest a years-long investigation that uncovered thousands of mishandled complaints in what officials described as “deeply disturbing” and likely the most comprehensive investigation ever undertaken on sexual violence in a major public school system.

“Over the last several years, American have become increasingly aware of sexual violence on colleges campuses,” Kenneth Marcus, assistant secretary for civil rights, said Thursday. “This may be a wake-up call that the problem exists on elementary and secondary schools as well. This is something we cannot tolerate.”

The investigation, which examined complaints dating back to 2012, uncovered 2,800 student-on-student sexual harassment complaints and 280 adult-on-student complaints at more than 400 schools in Chicago, the nation’s third-largest school district.

Full story at US News

Trump to HBCU Leaders: No One Has Done More for You Than Me

PRESIDENT TRUMP, IN A strained, 30-minute speech, told hundreds of leaders of historically black colleges and universities who were gathered for an annual conference that no other administration has done more for them than his.

The president called HBCUs “pillars of excellence” and “engines of advancement,” and said his administration was “protecting and promoting and supporting HBCUs like never before.”

“Bigger, and better and stronger than any administration, by far,” he said Tuesday afternoon at a hotel in downtown Washington, where HBCU officials and advocates gathered for the 2019 National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week Conference, hosted annually by the White House.

Full story at US News

You Can’t Hit Unsend: How A Social Media Scandal Unfolded At Harvard

Shortly after the 9-11 attacks, a photo made its way around the internet. It showed a man standing on the observation deck of the World Trade Center in New York City. His face is expressionless, unsmiling. He’s wearing a knitted black cap, sunglasses and an unzipped parka. Behind him, there’s a deep blue sky and views of Manhattan and the Hudson river. But there’s something else behind him too — a plane. It’s headed straight toward the tower. Rumor had it that the man died that day and his camera was later pulled from the rubble.

It’s an amazing shot and an amazing story, and it’s totally false.

The man is Peter Guzli and he’s Hungarian. The famous picture was snapped several years before the terrorist attacks.

After 9-11, Guzli edited the photo and added in the plane. He then emailed the image to a few friends “as a joke.” Those friends shared the image with their friends, and their friends shared it with more friends, and soon, the photo was everywhere.

Full story at NPR

School District Secessions Accelerate School Segregation

THE PHENOMENON IN WHICH wealthy communities take their schools and their tax base and splinter off from larger districts to form their own education systems is promoting racial segregation, according to a first-of-its-kind study published Wednesday.

Since 2000, school district secessions in the South have increasingly filtered white and black students, and white and Hispanic students, into separate school systems, according to new research published in “AERA Open,” a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

“Secession may reflect this narrowing concept of public schools and who the public schools are for,” Erica Frankenberg, a professor of education and demography at Pennsylvania State University and coauthor of the study, says. “Are they for educating everyone, or just kids who look like my kids?”

Full story at US News

Families, Not Just Students, Feel The Weight Of The Student Loan Crisis

For many college students settling into their dorms this month, the path to campus — and paying for college — started long ago. And it likely involved their families.

The pressure to send kids to college, coupled with the realities of tuition, has fundamentally changed the experience of being middle class in America, says Caitlin Zaloom, an anthropologist and associate professor at New York University. It’s changed the way that middle class parents raise their children, she adds, and shaped family dynamics along the way.

Zaloom interviewed dozens of families taking out student loans for her new book, Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost. She defines those families as middle class because they make too much to qualify for federal aid — but too little to pay the full cost of a degree at most colleges. For many, the burden of student debt raises big questions about what a degree is for.

Full story at NPR

U.S. Department of Education Finalizes Regulations to Protect Student Borrowers, Hold Higher Education Institutions Accountable and Save Taxpayers $11.1 Billion Over 10 Years

WASHINGTON—Today, the U.S. Department of Education finalized regulations that will protect student borrowers, hold higher education institutions accountable and provide financial protections to taxpayers. The Institutional Accountability regulations, posted on the Department’s website today, come after more than two years of deliberations, public hearings, negotiated rulemaking with a wide variety of higher education stakeholders and careful consideration of tens of thousands of public comments.

“If a school defrauds students, it must be held accountable,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. “There is no place for fraud in higher education, and it will not be tolerated by this Administration. From the recent college admissions scandal and intentional misrepresentations by schools to boost their U.S. News & World Report rankings to fraudulent marketing practices from proprietary intuitions, too many institutions of higher education are falling short. The new regulations are aimed at preventing this behavior because students deserve better, and all institutions must do better.

Full story at the US Department of Education

The Case For Summer Vacation

Put down those popsicles. No more sleeping in. Beach time is over.

Economists have long hated summer vacation. All those wasted school facilities! All that educational backsliding! Kids are getting dumber!

The conventional wisdom is that summer vacation is a relic of agricultural times, when kids had to help out their parents on the farm. But the economist William Fischel says that story is completely wrong.

“When the U.S. was a farming country, in the 1800s, kids went to school during the summer and winter,” he says. Rural kids had to take fall off for the harvest and spring off for planting. In other words, summer vacation would have “actually worked against the rhythms of agriculture.”

Full story at NPR

Not just Capital One, Equifax: Data breaches at school, risking your family’s security

Districts maintain reams of sensitive information about employees, students and families, all of it online and accessible to varying degrees to hundreds or thousands of employees – not all of whom were paying particularly close attention in this year’s mandatory cybersecurity webinar. With annual budgets in the tens or hundreds of millions, their pockets are deep, at least in theory, for the purposes of paying ransom.

And they can’t very well afford not to retrieve their data.

“On the list of things that keep me up at night, it’s a high one,” said John Miller, director of technology, data and program evaluation at the Hilton Central School District, about 20 miles north of Rochester, New York.

“If you ask any tech-related person in the field, they’ll tell you the same thing. … None of us want this to happen to us.”

Full story at USA Today

Four States Now Require Schools to Teach LGBT History

Starting next school year, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history will be part of the curriculum in Illinois public schools.

Democratic Governor J. B. Pritzker signed House Bill 246 into law Aug. 9, making Illinois the fourth state to mandate teaching LGBT history, after California, New Jersey, and Colorado. The Illinois legislation takes effect in July 2020.

The law mandates that history classes in public schools “include a study of the roles and contributions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people in the history of this country and this State.” Any textbooks bought with state funding must cover “the roles and contributions” of LGBT people, and can’t include content that is discriminatory to any particular gender or sexual orientation.

Nationwide, LGBT history often doesn’t make it into the curriculum. Just under a quarter of students say that they have learned about LGBT-related topics in their classes, according to 2016 research from GLSEN, a national advocacy group for LGBTQ students.

Full story at Education Week

900 New York City Classrooms Test Positive for Lead

MORE THAN 900 classrooms in New York City public schools tested positive for lead in recent months, according to data released by the city’s Department of Education.

The presence of lead-based paint and visible deterioration was found in 938 classrooms, according to the inspection by the city of more than 5,400 classrooms in nearly 800 schools built before 1985. Officials found deteriorating lead paint in 302 of the schools and deteriorating paint in 2,245 classrooms.

The findings were the result of typical end-of-year wear and tear, according to department officials, and will be fixed by the start of the school year. The inspections follow a local news investigation that found dangerous levels of lead in four schools.

“These inspections were done at the end of the year when classrooms have been used all year and are transitioning out and teachers are taking down posters,” says Miranda Barbot, the first deputy press secretary for the New York City Department of Education. “It wouldn’t be uncommon for there to be this type of wear and tear in the classroom.”

Full story at US News