Starting Monday, Advanced Placement exams, which test high schoolers’ knowledge of college material, will take an unusual form. The high-anxiety, college credit tests normally last three hours and are taken in person. But this year, in response to disruptions from the coronavirus outbreak, the College Board, which administers AP exams, shortened the tests to 45 minutes and moved them online.

The new format has raised questions about fairness. For many students, changing the test site from a proctored classroom to their devices at home is a big deal.

High school senior Natalie Szewczyk from Ashfield, Mass., was planning to take her two AP exams in her Toyota Corolla at a nearby elementary school parking lot. She has a spotty Internet connection at her house because her rural community doesn’t offer at-home broadband service. The parking lot seemed like a better option. But last week her school made plans to open up a small conference room for test-takers, which Szewczyk says came as a relief.

Full article at NPR

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