Schools Fear Deportation of DACA Recipient Teachers

IF THE SUPREME COURT rules in favor of the Trump administration, the future for teachers like Vicente Rodriguez and some 660,000 immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, would be in doubt.

“I made it my life’s mission to make sure students would never, ever experience such events and hardship in pursuit of education as I did,” he said to thousands of people gathered in front of the steps of the high court Tuesday as the justices began considering the Trump administration’s efforts to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA.

Rodriguez, who is a teaching assistant and DACA recipient from San Bernardino, California, is one of an estimated 20,000 teachers, assistant teachers and those in the process of being certified to become teachers who are protected under DACA in school districts all across the country.

Full story at US News

DeVos Subpoena On Hold – For Now

HOUSE DEMOCRATS WERE set to subpoena Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Friday for documents related to her department’s handling of borrower defense claims from students defrauded by for-profit colleges – the latest escalation in a public feud over the fallout of the secretary’s changes to Obama-era rules meant to rein in the sector and protect students.

The subpoena, which would have compelled the secretary to turn over certain records, would have been the first issued to DeVos by Rep. Bobby Scott, Virginia Democrat and chairman of the Education and Labor Committee.

But according to his committee staff, department officials agreed to turn over the requested papers by close of business Friday after learning the subpoena had been cleared by the House counsel and clerk.

Full story at US News

Secretary DeVos Names New Members to the National Assessment Governing Board

WASHINGTON— Today, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced the appointment of seven leaders from around the country to four-year terms as members of the National Assessment Governing Board.

This year’s slate includes six new members and one re-appointed member. The appointees’ terms officially began on Oct. 1, 2019, and will end on Sept. 30, 2023.

The appointees will help set policy for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as the Nation’s Report Card. NAEP offers to the public and to education policymakers at the national, state and local levels, objective data on student performance in nearly a dozen subjects. The information NAEP provides helps education stakeholders evaluate the progress of American education. The 26-member nonpartisan, independent Governing Board determines the subjects and content of NAEP tests, sets the achievement levels for reporting and publicly releases the results.

Full story at U.S. Department of Education

How Schools Are Using The Trump Impeachment Inquiry As A Teachable Moment

For the fourth time in history, Congress is considering impeaching the president of the United States. For teachers around the country, it’s an opportunity to explore concepts and skills that are often relegated to textbooks.

We asked social studies teachers from around the country how — if at all — they’re using this teachable moment, navigating the nationally polarizing topic and trying to sidestep the often asked question, “What do you think?”

Many educators told us they’re embracing the opportunity to bring concepts such as checks and balances to life. Some say they don’t have much time to address current events in class because of the amount of material they have to cover in a year.

Full story at NPR

Teachers Get Even With Bevin in Kentucky

KENTUCKY’S DEMOCRATIC Attorney General Andy Beshear leads current Gov. Matt Bevin by more than 5,000 votes in a high-profile gubernatorial race that drew more than 1.4 million people to the polls – a race considered by many as a bellwether for the potential impact educators may have in 2020.

For nearly three years, teachers have displayed a historic wave of activism across the country over issues of pay, increased funding, support services and the creep of charter schools, and that’s been especially true in Kentucky.

“To our educators, your courage to stand up and fight up against all the bullying and name calling helped galvanize our entire state,” Beshear said Tuesday evening during a victory speech. As of Wednesday, election results remained unofficial as Bevin sought a recanvas of the vote.

Full story at US News

U.S. Department of Education Rated Among Top Agencies on “Invest In What Works” Federal Standard of Excellence

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Education’s leading efforts to use evidence and data in its management, budget, and policy decisions have been recognized in Results for America’s 2019 Invest in What Works Federal Standard of Excellence. Results for America provides a snapshot of how federal agencies are building and using evidence and data to get better results for young people, their families, and communities. Among nine federal agencies examined, the Department of Education ranked third on the Federal Standard of Excellence, with a total score of 73 points out of a possible 100.

The Department of Education received the highest possible scores for leadership, related to federal agencies designating key personnel to lead evidence and data efforts, as well as common evidence standards, which examines how federal agencies classify evidence for use in research and funding decisions. Notably, Results for America recognized the Department for the strong use of evidence when allocating funds in competitive grant programs.

Full story at U.S. Department of Education

NCAA Plans To Allow College Athletes To Get Paid For Use Of Their Names, Images

In a surprise move, the NCAA says it intends to allow college athletes to earn compensation — but it says it’s only starting to work out the details of how that would take place. The organization’s board of governors said Tuesday that it had voted unanimously to permit student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.

“We must embrace change to provide the best possible experience for college athletes,” said Michael Drake, the NCAA board chair who is also president of Ohio State University. In a statement, Drake stressed the need for “additional flexibility” in the NCAA’s approach.

Drake added, “This modernization for the future is a natural extension of the numerous steps NCAA members have taken in recent years to improve support for student-athletes, including full cost of attendance and guaranteed scholarships.”

Full story at NPR

GAO Finds Loose Oversight of Scholarship Tax Credits

STATE OFFICIALS IN Arizona and Pennsylvania provide no oversight or monitoring of the private schools that participate in the tax credit scholarship programs they operate, a new report from the Government Accountability Office found, confirming long-standing concerns of congressional Democrats pushing back against the Trump administration’s pursuit of a federal tax credit program.

In a deep dive on the three states with the largest tax credit scholarship programs – Arizona, Florida and Pennsylvania – investigators with the nonpartisan investigative arm of Congress found that the states differ in how they oversee participating private schools. Specifically, they found that all four of Arizona’s tax credit scholarship programs and one of two Pennsylvania programs generally rely on the individual scholarship-granting organizations to confirm that schools comply with program requirements.

Full story at US News

DeVos Sued Amid New Evidence About Whether Her Agency Aided For-Profit Operator

TWO STUDENT ADVOCACY groups have filed separate lawsuits against Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, one alleging her Department of Education allowed an operator of for-profit schools to mislead students and sack them with debt they are now unable to repay, and another that accused her of continuing to refuse to discharge the student loan debt of borrowers previously enrolled in for-profit schools that abruptly shuttered.

The lawsuits were filed Tuesday, the same day House Democrats threatened to subpoena DeVos for obstructing their investigation into the department’s role in allowing the operator of for-profit colleges to mislead students and continue operating the schools despite losing their accreditation.

The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia by National Student Legal Defense Network is directly related to the subpoena issued by House Democrats. It alleges that the Education Department’s actions “caused students at the schools to borrow money and waste months of their lives in pursuit of an education they did not know was unaccredited.”

Full story at US News

How to Manage Discord Over Student Discipline

The principal-teacher relationship faces a lot of potential stressors, from dealing with parents to disagreements over who has to do lunch duty.

But perhaps nothing causes more friction between principals and teachers than how to discipline students.

Teachers and principals alike—although to varying degrees—rank student discipline as the biggest source of disagreement between the two groups, according to a survey by the Education Week Research Center.

Full story at Education Week